Last in the 3-part series on 2022 stone projects you should be starting to plan and execute now

In this 3rd and concluding article of this 3-part series, we highlight three more projects for next year that you should be starting your prep work on right now. In the 2nd article of this series we discussed 3 large projects around your property often incorporating stone that you want to start now for nextContinue reading “Last in the 3-part series on 2022 stone projects you should be starting to plan and execute now”

Staying at home when the kids go back to school next week? It’s the perfect time to start a DIY stone project!

It’s finally almost here – our kids are going back to school! Yes, indeed, schools in our area are fully reopening on time for in-classroom learning next week. Last year as most of us remember, COVID delayed the opening schools for face-to-face teaching and learning. Schools in our area did not reopen until the beginningContinue reading “Staying at home when the kids go back to school next week? It’s the perfect time to start a DIY stone project!”

The qualities to look for when picking out Flagstone for your stone projects

One of the most-asked questions we get from our customers is “What type of Flagstone do you recommend for (insert name of stone project the customer is about to undertake)?” In truth, there is rarely a ‘perfect answer’ to this question. Not only does Flagstone vary from quarry to quarry, it varies from stone toContinue reading “The qualities to look for when picking out Flagstone for your stone projects”

Planting ideas for November – and all-year around – thanks to UGA’s Cooperative Extension outreach program

One of the many great aspects of living here in Georgia is beautiful autumn weekends like this one. The sun is shining, the temperature is cool and refreshing (it will be even warmer tomorrow) and you feel happy to be alive. This is the perfect weather for tailgating and football; a trip to the mountainsContinue reading “Planting ideas for November – and all-year around – thanks to UGA’s Cooperative Extension outreach program”